Understanding the Priesthood

sunset

by Michael Maciel

In order to understand the Priesthood, we have to go back to basic Holy Order of MANS teachings about one’s personal atmosphere—that field of energy around each person’s body that is encoded with the thoughts, feelings, and experiences of an individual’s earthly existence. I have come to feel my own atmosphere as my “presence,” meaning, for lack of better words, the effect I have on the world around me in an energetic sense—not like a mechanical force field so much as a field with personality. Everyone has this, although they might not be aware of it in a way that lets them also see it in others.

Once you do, however, it becomes possible to offer it up as a vehicle for higher beings—those humans who have evolved beyond the need to be here on the earth plane—so that they can impart their spiritual energies and consciousness through your atmosphere/presence to those humans who are in need, whether those needs are physical or spiritual, which I have come more and more to see as the same.

Giving oneself up as a vehicle for a higher being is precisely what Jesus of Nazareth did, only the Being that used him was the Christ Being, or the Lord of the Sun. This idea might sound foreign to some readers, but it makes perfect sense to me, not because I learned it in the HOOM, but because everything I know as a human being on this planet tells me that the Sun is the source of all life, and not just as a blind force but as a living conscious presence, full of intelligence and personality.

When I was ordained a priest, it was through and by the authority of Jesus AS Christ (I like that better than simply “Jesus Christ,” because it better describes who and what he is). Jesus AS Christ conveys the reality of the greater being of The Christ working through the personality of the human person of Jesus. After being ordained, I began to become more and more aware of Jesus AS Christ showing up in my atmosphere/presence, especially while serving communion, which I have come to understand as the best way to grow and develop this relationship with this particular being.

The communion is an ancient ritual, preceding Jesus of Nazareth by hundreds if not thousands of years (no one really knows how long), which was appropriated by early Christians as a sacrament. It acts as a vehicle of sorts through which Jesus can “communicate” his life energy and presence to people on the Earth plane through the mediation of a priest. This energy isn’t “his” so much as it is the One for Whom he mediates, namely the Christ Being, the Lord of the Sun.

If the term “Lord of the Sun” bothers you, which it does most people, please bear in mind that we’re not talking so much about that massive star at the center of our solar system as we are the spiritual body of the Sun, the one that fills and permeates the entire system in which we live.  Every living thing bears its imprint—from the molecular level all the way to the level of consciousness. Science is discovering every day how and why this is true, although they use different names for it.

So, to understand the Priesthood is to understand the way the Christ Being, working through Jesus AS Christ, who in turn works through the atmosphere/presence of the priest (whether male or female, by the way) for the purpose of being a channel of grace to everyone living on the Earth plane.

This is the “function and purpose” of the Priesthood. One can aspire to it if one feels so called, but the actual hook-up, so to speak, has to come from above. It is not an earthly institution, although it is specifically designed to function in the Earth plane. It is an “initiation,” which means that your entire life will be different—forever. Once you have it, the presence of God becomes a part of your presence, so much so that people can sense that there is something different about you, even if you’re not wearing some kind of identifiable garment or insignia.

But just know that the motivation for becoming a priest must come from the heart—from the soul, actually—manifesting itself as an intense desire to serve all people everywhere, not just those of your own family or clan. It’s not like becoming a politician where you represent only certain interests over others. You become a universal servant in every sense of the word.

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2 Responses to Understanding the Priesthood

  1. Raymond Rau says:

    good stuff. I feel it all the time. Say more.

  2. Well said Michael – softly, with heart. Brought tears to my eyes.

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